Bus Service Reliability Framework

This is a Parliament Question I asked the Transport Minister on 20 January 2014 regarding the new “Bus Service Reliability Framework”, which includes incentives for public bus operators for exceeding service standards set by the Land Transport Authority (LTA).

This is a Parliament Question I asked the Transport Minister on 20 January 2014 regarding the new “Bus Service Reliability Framework”, which includes incentives for public bus operators for exceeding service standards set by the Land Transport Authority (LTA).

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Mr Gerald Giam Yean Song asked the Minister for Transport with regard to the new Bus Service Reliability Framework (a) what evidence does the LTA rely on to determine that providing financial incentives rather than just penalties to public bus operators to arrive at bus stops on schedule will improve waiting times; and (b) whether the incentive amounts will be funded by taxpayers.

Mr Lui Tuck Yew (The Minister for Transport): Bus operators have to incur additional costs to monitor and improve en-route reliability and regularity of the trial bus services under the Bus Service Reliability Framework (BSRF). For example, the operators need to hire and train more bus controllers to manage bus services more closely, instruct bus drivers to slow down and mobilise standby buses. The operators may also need to modify and enhance their operations control systems. Hence, there must be some net financial incentive in the design of this Framework.

We have also looked closely at overseas examples, in particular, the London system which has worked well and been carefully refined over many years. For a start, we have modelled our incentive-penalty structure for this BSRF pilot quite closely after the London system, but we will certainly review and improve along the way to make it cost-effective to benefit commuters who have consistently mentioned reliability of buses as a priority area for improvement.

The BRSF will be funded by the Government, as it is a trial to assess whether it can improve the reliability of our bus services.

[Source: Singapore Parliament Reports]

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There was also a debate during Question Time that same day on the service delivery requirements under the Bus Service Reliability Framework. This is a supplementary question I asked the Minister and his reply:

Mr Gerald Giam Yean Song: Would it not be more straightforward to just set high enough standards and then penalise the PTOs for failing to meet those standards? Because this can certainly spur improvements at the backend as well, and the PTOs’ reward really is in more satisfied customers and bigger ridership.

Mr Lui Tuck Yew: We also have to try and arrive at a position and at a model that is fair to all parties concerned. With greater demand, there will be calls for greater injection of resources. So we are trying to find a balance between incentives and penalties in order to arrive at a better situation than what we have today.

[Source: Singapore Parliament Reports]

Author: Gerald Giam

Gerald Giam is the Member of Parliament for Aljunied GRC. He is a member of the Workers' Party of Singapore. The opinions expressed on this page are his alone.

3 thoughts on “Bus Service Reliability Framework”

  1. You should asked or demand the Minister Lui to “QUIT.”

    What are you waiting for, waiting for LTK approval to ask the question..

  2. The big bang on the purchase of more buses should be queried on the model type ie whether they are all double-decker buses. The gain on productivity and boost on bus fare revenue are pretty obvious and need no further comment. If the purchased buses are on some single deck buses, the automatic question that follows should be WHY ???

  3. Loved to read your blog. I would like to suggest you that traffic show most people read blogs on Mondays. So it should encourage blogger to write new write ups over the weekend primarily

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